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Intersections of Spirituality, Social Justice, and Climate Change

This event is free and open to the public, but registration is required.    Reflection and panel discussion on how and where spirituality, social justice, and climate change come together and intersect within faith traditions. Speakers: Dan McKanan, AB ’89, Ralph Waldo Emerson UUA Senior Lecturer at Harvard Divinity School , Sofía Betancourt, Associate Professor of Unitarian Universalist Theologies and Ethics at Starr King School for the Ministry , Elizabeth Eaton, MDiv ’80, Presiding Bishop of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America , Rosalyn LaPier, WSRP '17, Associate Professor, Environmental Studies at University of Montana This event will be recorded. Closed captioning will be provided, and persons with disabilities who wish to request accommodations or who have questions about access, please contact derevents@hds.harvard.edu in advance of the session. Sponsor: HDS Office of Development and External Relations. Contact: derevents@hds.harvard.edu. Wednesday, March 3, 2021, 2:00 PM – 3:00 PM. Zoom (Registration required. See link in event description.). For more info visit harvard.zoom.us.

Author Discussion: Who’s Your Daddy by Arisa White in Conversation with Rev. angel Kyodo williams Sensei

This event is free and open to the public, but registration is required.  Who’s Your Daddy is Arisa White's debut poetic memoir for which, with funding from the Center for Cultural Innovation in Los Angeles, she was able to go to Guyana, South America, to meet her father after 30-plus years of estrangement. With this same artist grant, White was able to offer community workshops for people to write letters to their own absent fathers, and some of those letters became centos in the collection. Poet Terrance Hayes writes that Who’s Your Daddy “gives us archives, allegories, and wholly new songs.” It is a collection of healing and repair, which took White seven years to complete, starting in her Jesus Year. Through the lyric, she attempts to renovate her relationship with her father, patriarchy, and masculinity from the absence he gave. Augury Books will publish Who’s Your Daddy on March 1, 2021. Much of Arisa White's poetry and contemplative practice have been informed by the spiritual writings and… Sponsor: Center for the Study of World Religions. Contact: CSWR, 617.495.4476. Wednesday, March 3, 2021, 5:00 PM – 6:30 PM. Zoom (Registration required. See link in event description.). For more info visit harvard.zoom.us.

The Religious Dimensions of Myanmar’s Protests

This event is free and open to the public, but registration is required.  On February 1st, Myanmar’s military seized power in early morning coup. Almost immediately, citizens from across the country rose up in protest. Originating with health care workers, the protest movement quickly spread to encompass diverse communities and constituencies. Despite increased military intimidation in the form of nighttime arrests, use of force, and internet shortages, the largely youth-led civil disobedience movement has proven defiant. The protests have shown both extraordinary creativity and pragmatic coordination to provide mutual aid support for striking government employees and to forge trans-national alliances. In this deeply religious country, religious clergy, symbols, practices, charity networks, and places of worship have all featured as part of the protest landscape. In this online discussion, Burmese and Thai activists of diverse backgrounds will analyze the religious dimensions of both the coup and the… Sponsor: Religion and Public Life. Contact: Navi Hardin. Wednesday, March 10, 2021, 6:00 PM – 7:00 PM. Zoom (Registration required. See link in the event description). For more info visit harvard.zoom.us.

A Gendered Analysis of an Egyptian Mortuary Ritual

Mariam Ayad (The American University in Cairo), Visiting Associate Professor of Women’s Studies and Near Eastern Religions, will give the lecture, “A Gendered Analysis of an Egyptian Mortuary Ritual.”. Sponsor: Women's Studies in Religion Program at HDS. Contact: Tracy Wall. Thursday, March 11, 2021, 12:00 PM. TBD.

Buddhism and Race Speaker Series: Duncan Ryūken Williams: "The Karma of A Nation: Racial Reparations From An Asian American Buddhist Perspective"

This event is free and open to the public, but registration is required. Check back for registration link. The forced removal and incarceration of over 125,000 persons of Japanese ancestry, two-thirds of them Buddhists, in U.S. concentration camps during WWII began with the arrest of Buddhist priests even before the smoke had cleared at Pearl Harbor. The prewar surveillance of Buddhist temples and the making of registries that targeted Buddhist priests, unlike Christian ministers, as threats to national security was based on a long-standing presumption that America is essentially a White Christian nation. The first federal immigration law that targeted a particular group for exclusion from the United States was the 1882 Chinese Exclusion Act, legislation that deemed the predominantly Buddhist Chinese immigrants as the “heathen Chinee,” a group religiously and racially unassimilable. Despise this long history of religion-racial animus, Buddhists who found themselves behind barbed wire in camps surrounded by… Sponsor: HDS Buddhist Community. Contact: studentlife@hds.harvard.edu. Tuesday, March 16, 2021, 5:00 PM – 6:30 PM. Zoom (Registration required. See link in event description.).

Vivien Sansour and the Heirloom Seed Library

This event is free and open to the public, but registration is required.  Vivien Sansour is founder of the Palestine Heirloom Seed Library where she works with farmers to propagate and recover threatened heirloom varieties and creates local and international public awareness campaigns to educate people about Palestinian agricultural heritage and biodiversity. A trained anthropologist, she is currently a Fellow at Harvard's Religion, Conflict, and Peace Initiative, which is co-hosting this webinar with API. Sponsor: Abrahamic Path Initiative; The Religion, Conflict, and Peace Initiative at HDS Religion and Public Life; The Center for the Study of World Religions. Contact: Navi Hardin. Thursday, March 18, 2021, 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM. Zoom (Registration required. See link in event description.). For more info visit zoom.us.

Reasonably Irrational: Theurgy and the Pathologization of Entheogenic Experience

This event is free and open to the public, but registration is required.  In this lecture, Wouter Hanegraaff will be discussing the relevance of entheogens to theurgy and ritual evocation in Roman Egypt, with special attention to the story of Thessalos, the so-called Mithras Liturgy, and the Neoplatonic practice of Iamblichus. Wouter will be arguing that if we deny or marginalize the clear evidence for entheogenic practice in these contexts- while acknowledging the spectacular visions and experiences that are claimed in the texts- it is hard to avoid traditional pathologizing interpretations of experiential practices that, in fact, can be rationally accounted. Sponsor: Center for the Study of World Religions. Contact: Navi Hardin. Monday, March 22, 2021, 3:00 PM – 4:30 PM. Zoom (Registration required. See link in event description.). For more info visit harvard.zoom.us.

HDS Reorientation & Common Read Program

Restorative Justice & Transforming Mass Incarceration, a conversation featuring HDS Professor Matt Potts and HDS MTS candidate Eboni Nash. Check back for more information. Sponsor: HDS Racial Justice & Healing Committee and HDS Office of Diversity, Inclusion, & Belonging. Contact: Melissa Bartholomew, HDS Associate Dean of DIB. Wednesday, March 24, 2021, 3:30 PM – 5:00 PM. Zoom (link to be provided).

Religion and the Rise of Capitalism

This event is free and open to the public, but registration is required.  Where do our ideas about how the economy works, and our views on economic policy, come from? Critics of contemporary economics complain that belief in free markets, among economists as well as many ordinary citizens, is a form of religion. The foundational transition in thinking about what we now call economics, beginning in the eighteenth century, was decisively shaped by the hotly contended lines of religious thought at that time within the English-speaking Protestant world. Beliefs about God-given human character, about the afterlife, and about the purpose of our existence, were all under scrutiny in the world in which Adam Smith and his contemporaries lived. Even today, those long-ago religious debates go far in explaining the puzzling behavior of so many of our fellow citizens whose views about economic policies—and whose voting behavior—seems sharply at odds with what would be to their own economic benefit. Sponsor: Center for the Study of World Religions and the Committee on the Study of Religion. Contact: Navi Hardin. Wednesday, March 24, 2021, 4:30 PM – 6:00 PM. Zoom (Registration required. See link in event description.). For more info visit harvard.zoom.us.

Seeking More than Salvation: Religious Communities

This event is free and open to the public, but registration is required.  HDS Assistant Professor of African American Religions Todne Thomas (Kincraft: The Making of Black Evangelical Sociality) and scholar Tony Tian-Ren Lin (Prosperity Gospel Latinos and Their American Dream) discuss their new books, in which they explore the religious cultural dynamics of Latino immigrants and Black evangelicals, respectively. These studies explore lived experiences, how church members may use their spiritual relationships to navigate racial and ethnic discrimination, and the rewards the church may offer in addition to salvation. This event is hosted by the Institute for Advanced Studies in Culture, an interdisciplinary research center and intellectual community at the University of Virginia committed to understanding contemporary cultural change and its individual and social consequences, training young scholars, and providing intellectual leadership in service to the public good. The 2021 Virginia Festival of the… Sponsor: Institute for Advanced Studies in Cultureat the University of Virginia. Contact: Virginia Festival of the Book. Friday, March 26, 2021, 2:00 PM – 3:00 PM. Zoom (Registration required. See link in event description.). For more info visit zoom.us.

Faith and Flourishing: Strategies for Preventing and Healing Child Sexual Abuse

This event is free and open to the public, but registration is required.  The Human Flourishing Program at Harvard University’s Institute for Quantitative Social Science, in partnership with the Papal Commission on the Protection of Minors, will convene public health professionals, religious leaders, and abuse survivors from across the world for a free, public, interfaith symposium to improve the health and spiritual wellbeing of victims of childhood sexual abuse, trafficking, and exploitation. Participants can take part in daily, hour-long round table discussions from April 8-10 to identify actions their communities can take to prevent child sexual abuse and promote healing for its victims. Participants will also have the opportunity to view a series of presentations by global leaders and experts on the prevention and healing of child sexual abuse, and access evidence-informed tools, training materials, and multi-media resources for prevention and healing. This landmark symposium provides mental… Sponsor: Human Flourishing Program at Harvard’s Institute for Quantitative Social Science; Harvard Divinity School; the Initiative on Health, Religion, and Spirituality at Harvard University; The Pontifical Commission for the Protection of Minors; The Catholic Project at the Catholic University of America; Centre for Child Protection; Arigatou International; The New York Board of Rabbis;  Prevent Child Abuse America; Darkness to Light; The Harvard Catholic Forum; The Berkley Center at Georgetown University; FADICA. Contact: hfh_events@fas.harvard.edu. Thursday, April 8, 2021 – Saturday, April 10, 2021. Online (Registration required. See link in event description.). For more info visit hfh.fas.harvard.edu.